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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of Theoretical studies of pulse propagation and evolution in mode locked dye lasers. found in the catalog.

Theoretical studies of pulse propagation and evolution in mode locked dye lasers.

Lorna Dorothy Clements

Theoretical studies of pulse propagation and evolution in mode locked dye lasers.

by Lorna Dorothy Clements

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph. D.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1974.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19187412M

Jean-Claude Diels, Matthias Lenzner, James Hendrie, Ning Hsu, Luke Horstman, Hanieh Afkhamiardakani, Ladan Arissian, Control of pulse velocity and dispersion in mode-locked lasers, in SPIE OPTO proc. , Optical, Opto-Atomic, and . of passively mode-locked lasers. The “open time” of the bleachable dye is greatly reduced from the normal excited state lifetime in, for example, the mode-lock- ing of rhodamine 6G lasers by DODCI. The operation of a recently reported [8], picosecond gated optical.

AbstractLayered transition metal dichalcogenides with excellent nonlinear. A simplified model is presented of passively mode-locked dye lasers with self-phase modulation and group-velocity dispersion. The model treats pulse width and chirp as dynamical variables and follows their evolution in a pulse-width--chirp phase plane as they approach steady state.

We consider the role of the pump pulse in the output of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser. Our theoretical formalism is a nonlinear dynamical model that includes semiclassical effects, dipole orientation, and intrband relaxation. In particular, we study the shortenting of the output pulse with decreasing pump pulse length and increasing pump level. He spent the next 3 years (way too short) to do Ph.D. thesis research on coherent pulse propagation in two level systems with Professor Erwin L. Hahn at UC Berkeley. The next two years (too long) were spent at the Max Plank Institute with Professor Fritz Schaefer, the colorful (usually covered with red) father of dye lasers.


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Theoretical studies of pulse propagation and evolution in mode locked dye lasers by Lorna Dorothy Clements Download PDF EPUB FB2

Colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) dye lasers are used widely to generate femtosecond light pulses []. The colliding pulse mode-locking was achieved in ring lasers [I] and in linear resonators including either an anti-resonant ring [4, 5], a contacted absorber cell [6] or an absorber cell in the middle of the cavity [3, 7].

Various gain dye. Theoretical studies of pulse propagation and evolution in mode locked dye lasers Author: Clements, L. ISNI: Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast Date of Award: Availability of Full Text.

@article{osti_, title = {Analysis of periodic pulse evolutions in a passively mode-locked ring dye laser}, author = {Avramopoulos, H and French, P M.W. and New, G H.C.

and Opalinska, M M and Taylor, J R and Williams, J A.R.}, abstractNote = {Complex pulse evolutions have been observed in a passively mode-locked CPM ring dye laser which have been shown to be highly sensitive to the.

The pulse development in colliding pulse mode-locked dye lasers is analysed theoretically. The chosen parameters belong to a c.w.

argon laser pumped linear resonator arrangement with rhodamine 6G. Some other theoretical researches in TDF are reported by solving the rate equation.

However, numerical research on multiple pulses in mode-locked TDF lasers is rare. In this paper, through solving the extended NLSE, we numerically investigated the pulse evolution in a TDF ring laser mode locked by a saturable absorber (SA).Cited by: 5.

Abstract. The pulse development in colliding pulse mode-locked dye lasers is analysed theoretically. The chosen parameters belong to a c.w. argon laser pumped linear resonator arrangement with rhodamine 6G in ethylene glycol as gain medium and DODCI (3,3′-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide) in ethylene glycol as saturable absorber.

Abstract: Various models of a passively mode-locked quasi-continuous laser are discussed and the evolution of pulses in various cavity configurations is traced.

In certain circumstances, the combined action of amplifier and absorber saturation is shown to lead to rapid pulse compression even when the pulse duration is far shorter than the relaxation time of either nonlinear component. ultrashort optical pulse amplification, the theory of this subject seems to have lagged behind.

To date, only a few theoretical studies on picosecond or subpicosecond dye la- ser pulse amplification have been reported.“-” These rate equation models have explained many aspects of dye laser.

Abstract: Fiber lasers mode locked with large normal group-velocity dispersion have recently achieved femtosecond pulse durations with energies and peak powers at least an order of magnitude greater than those of prior approaches.

Several new mode-locking regimes have been demonstrated, including self-similar pulse propagation in passive and active fibers, dissipative solitons, and a pulse. It is routinely applied in solid-state and fiber lasers. Using this method, the sub 5-fs pulses have been obtained from the Ti:sapphire lasers without the external pulse compression.

The synchronous mode-locking has a much broader range of gain media that can be used, than in the case of the passive mode. Several new mode-locking regimes have been demonstrated, including self-similar pulse propagation in passive and active fibers, dissipative solitons, and a pulse evolution that avoids wave breaking at high peak power but has not been reproduced by theoretical treatment.

Pulse propagation effects as mentioned above are relevant in various kinds of situations. Some examples are: Details of the propagation of ultrashort pulses in a mode-locked laser determine the steady-state pulse properties such as pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp, or the stability of pulse generation, multiple pulsing, etc.; The propagation in fibers is relevant e.g.

for pulse. (Book review: "Masers and Lasers")," Science, vol. and J. Whinnery, "Stability and astigmatic compensation analysis of five-mirror cavity for mode-locked dye lasers," Applied and A.

Dienes, "A novel method of analyzing optical pulse propagation: Dispersion of matrices and its application of ultra-high-speed time division. Mode‐locked ytterbium‐doped fiber lasers capable of producing nanosecond‐, picosecond‐ or femtosecond‐level pulses with high energy or power have many advantages for various applications such as material processing and laser surgery.

Firstly, in this chapter, the principles and methods used in passively mode‐locked fiber lasers are briefly described. A continuous train of dye laser pumped by a mode−locked argon ion laser. The cavity lengths of the dye laser and argon laser were made equal in order to synchronously amplify a single pulse oscillating in the dye laser.

An intracavity acousto−optic modulator was used to dump dye laser pulses at rates as high as 10 MHz. Several laser manufacturers now sell reliable cw mode-locked dye lasers delivering ~3-picosecond-long pulses at ~MHz repetition rates. These pulses may be selectively amplified to energies in the millijoule regime (i.e., having peak powers of ~ watts), and pulse length measurements, including delay times, are routinely carried out by the.

The generution of ultrashort laser pulses media. the desired pulse duration and practical considerations such as cost, the stability and pulse quality requirements and the need for synchronization to other signals.

Requirements for pulse durations vary with application: many electronic detection systems are limited to temporal resolutions of tens of ps while pump/probe measure. Intense research activity is thus considering new mode-locked cavity designs, pulse shaping dynamics and associated nonlinear limitations.

Dispersion (and its interplay with nonlinearity) is a principal factor in uencing the pulse dynamics in mode-locked bre lasers.

While early studies (e.g. using dye lasers [3]) established an understanding. Mode-locked fiber lasers have generated major interest as an alternative to solid-state systems owing to improved simplicity, stability and cost.

From a purely scientific point of view, optical fibers and fiber lasers provide convenient and reproducible experimental settings for the study of a variety of nonlinear dynamical processes.

Theoretical analysis of contributions of self-phase modulation and group-velocity dispersion to femtosecond pulse generation in passive mode-locked dye lasers. Penzkofer, M.

Wittmann, W. Bäumler, and V. Petrov Appl. Opt. 31(33) (). This demonstration of picosecond pulse generation from to μm is, to our knowledge, the first dysprosium mode-locked laser, the first mode-locked fiber source in this region, and the mostly widely tunable mode-locked fiber laser to date, creating new opportunities to exploit the full potential of the mid-IR.Timing sychronization between a colliding‐pulse mode‐locked dye laser and a gain‐switched Fabry–Perot‐type AlGaAs laser diode has been achieved with less than 40 fs of relative timing.The transient nature of the mode locked pulses proved to be problematic in practical applications (ultrafast spectroscopy, nonlinear optics, etc.).

This problem was solved in when Ippen et al. introduced a laser based on the saturable dye (Rhodamine 6G) that could mode lock continuously. The pulses from this laser were found to have pulse.